Envision your dream life (and make it real)

Back when I was in the third or fourth grade, I came up with a list of things I would do the time I turned 30:

-graduate from college
-get a job
-buy a house
-get married (closer to when I turned 30)
-get ready to have kids (by doing the rest of the things on the list)

It recently occurred to me that it’s time to come up with a new vision for my future.  I’m 29 now, and I’ve done almost every item on my by-the-time-I’m-30 list.  (I’m not married yet, but I am engaged.  Love you, Sam!)

This time around, I’ve chosen to approach my future in a different way.  Ever since my sister watched The Secret, she had talked about how we should create vision boards for ourselves, visual representations of what we wanted in life.  I liked the idea, and we agreed that someday, we’d get together and do just that.  For years we put it off, but with the impending completion/expiration of my by-the-time-I’m-30 list, I figured now was a good time to get together over a weekend and get it done.  My cousin came over, too, and my living room turned into an arts and crafts and vision and encouragement fest.

Visions are different from goals.  Continue reading

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Now it has become your job to pass on that lesson

Yesterday at work, my team was interviewing job applicants for an open position we have.  The standout comment someone made during the debrief was:

“Hey, you know that website that one candidate said she co-founded?  It’s actually real!”

It’s a pretty cool website, too.  It’s called thanksforteaching.us and it’s a site where you can post quick thank you notes to teachers.  It reminded me of a thank you letter I sent last year:

Dear Mr. Varela,
 

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Putting it out there

About a month ago, my little sister came over to hang out and tell me “something big” about what she has planned for this year.

“So, how’s your job?”

“It’s great.  I’m loving my job!”

“You’re loving it?  But, aren’t you back working the same job you quit 6 months ago?”

“Yeah, but it’s a little different.  It’s always different when I come back from quitting.  They change all of the things I didn’t like about the job before I quit.”

This was the third time my sister has quit that job, and the third time she’s gone back to it.  She’s really good at her job, and her boss knows it.  I’m not sure he would know what to do if she were to quit for real.

“Ok, so what’s you’re big news?”
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Getting un-stuck

When I first started this blog, I was soo ready.  I had hundreds of ideas I wanted to communicate, and I just needed somewhere to put them.  For the first week or so, I wrote a lot.  Or at least, it *felt* like a lot, for a number-crunchy non-writer like me.  I wrote what was on my mind.  I wrote posts inspired by feedback I had gotten from people who read my earlier posts.  I had never counted writing as one of my strengths, yet people were saying positive things about what I had written.

And then it occurred to me:

Crap.  People are actually reading what I’m writing. What should I write next?  Should I finish the networking series?  Should I continue to write about self-exploration?  Should I write things that will be useful to the undergrads I’m speaking to next week, or should I write something for my friend who’s going on a sabbatical?  Who should I write for, and when?

So, you’ve probably noticed (or maybe not, because who’s really waiting for my next post) that I haven’t written anything new for more than a week.    Here’s the advice I had a hard time putting into practice:

There are two types of thinking: divergent thinking and convergent thinking. Both are useful in creativity and problem solving, but you must keep them separate.

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