Networking: Getting started (Part 2)

In the last post, we established:

  1. There is at least one person willing to help you in this process of figuring out what you want to do
  2. You need to tell them that you need help and how they can help you

This post is about how to ask for help.

Step 1: Compile a list of people to contact. Think about who is in your inner, middle, and outer circles.  Write down the names of your family, friends, teachers, classmates, alumni, community associates, etc.  You can grow this list by building your network, which typically involves going to events, getting involved, and meeting new people.  (Scroll down to the bottom of my last post and read my friend’s comment on building your network.)
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Networking: Getting started (Part 1)

My cousin goes back to San Jose State’s college of business every semester to talk to juniors and seniors, and one of the things he stresses to them is the value of networking.

My cousin and I, like many people, didn’t really get into networking until we needed a job.  It’s too bad, because it was at that point that we realized we should have started much earlier.  And so we go back to colleges to tell juniors and seniors to learn from our mistakes and begin to network while still in school.

Many students I’ve talked to recognize that this is good advice, but don’t know how to act on it.

“But I don’t have a network.  Most of the people I know are my age.”

You do have a network.  Remember, a network is a set of interdependent relationships in which people will want to help you and have the means to help you.  I can think of at least one person who will want to help you. Your mom.

I bet there are others who would be happy to help you: your dad, your siblings, your extended family, your neighbors growing up, your old coach, your favorite teachers from high school, your spiritual leader, your current professors, friends from the class that graduated above you, etc.

“But none of those people are doing things I’m interested in.”

Remember that networking is not just about who you know, but who *they* may know. Maybe your dad plays tennis with someone who studied the same thing you’re studying.  Your grandma’s friend from church just retired from being the head of a big company.  My boyfriend’s mom trains in kung fu with a woman who gave me great career advice (true story).

Yet all these people who would love to help you, may not know that you need them to, or how.  You have to tell them.

“So what do I ask for?  I don’t event know what kind of job I want.”

You don’t have to.  That’s why you need their help.  Besides, you’re not asking for a job.  You will be asking your network to put you in touch with people who can provide you with information, advice, and more people to contact. The goal is to have your network put you in touch with people with whom you have a 20-30 minute conversation, often called an “informational interview.”  These informational interviews are a way for you to learn about what options exist for you, and what it takes to get there.

“Ok. But I feel bad.  Why would someone want to take time out of their busy schedule to talk to me?”

Here’s the biggest secret about informational interviews: People love talking about themselves. They LOVE it.  Trust me.  I admit it.  I love talking about myself.  And wow, if talking about myself can *help* someone?  AWESOME.

I hope I’ve dispelled any mental blocks you’ve had about networking, because it’s time to get started.  Next post: How to write that letter asking for help.

Coming soon!

I just started this blog yesterday, but I’ve been thinking about it for a couple years, so already have a bunch of ideas for post topics.  For now, the list includes:

Finding Direction: exercises in how to figure out what you want to do and how your interests can translate into making a living

Getting/Creating your dream job: leveraging the network you have, developing your network, conducting informational interviews, following-up, pitching your own internship

Succeeding at your first job/ internship (for recent college grads): managing upward, structuring effective communication, useful Excel tips, taking control of your own professional development

Personal development: dealing with the voice in your head, facing fears, managing stress, finding courage to do what you love

Keep checking back, and let me know what else you might find helpful!